Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn Essay example


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Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn No one who has read the novel Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain can deny not seeing the faults of the civilized world that Twain so critically satires. This element of the novel plays the perfect backdrop to the thing Twain uses to compare civilization with: The ideal way of living.


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The first glimpse that we get of the civilized world in Huck’s time comes to us as early as the first chapter. Huck describes to the reader how he is getting along in civilization. He tells us things about society that he doesn’t yet understand, like how the Widow forbids him to smoke yet she uses tobacco herself.


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This insight that Twain gives to the reader is further expanded with the introduction of Huck’s Pap into the story. After leaving Huck for a little over a year, Pap comes back for Huck, figuring he may have something to gai...


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